sharing is caring: #70

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1. Tips to remember when networking or starting new relationships.

Don’t hog the conversation, ask questions and pay attention to what they say.

As famous adman David Ogilvy said, “If you want to be interesting, be interested.”

Schedule time for routine follow-ups, which can be about anything.

Send a relevant article to someone who interviewed you for a job you didn’t get. Even though it didn’t work out, you liked that person you met, and want to stay in touch. Show that you’re a good sport and still attentive to the company and industry. (Just don’t revisit the job interview.)

Say hello to someone you met at a conference last year with the just-published agenda for this year’s event, asking if they’ll be attending.

Share interesting news about your old company with a former colleague. Former coworkers are sometimes the best weak ties — you may not have known them well, but there’s a feeling of kinship. A simple note asking what they’re up to along with a story can keep the connection going, or even strengthen it.

Show you’re paying attention to your weak ties by sending them items (news, event, commentary) related to their interests. For someone you don’t know well, this will give a moment of delight and appreciation. What you send is based on what you know: are they presenting at a conference, doing research, passionate about a project, focused on an emerging trend?

5. Reinforce a connection you just made by following up with relevant information. If you just met someone and talked about mobile phone usage, send the news story you spotted on this with a brief note (“This made me think of our conversation”).

2. It’s official — childhood is ruined.Read More »

sharing is caring: #68

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1. One of the most thought provoking and relatable long essay that explores the myth of an “ideal” woman.

The ideal woman, in other words, is always optimizing. She takes advantage of technology, both in the way she broadcasts her image and in the meticulous improvement of that image itself.

The ideal woman steps into a stratum of expensive juices, boutique exercise classes, skincare routines and vacations, and there she happily remains.

Today’s ideal woman is of a type that coexists easily with feminism in its current market-friendly and mainstream form. This sort of feminism has organized itself around being as visible and appealing to as many people as possible; it has greatly over-valorized women’s individual success.

The ritualization and neatness of this process (and the fact that Sweetgreen is pretty good) obscure the intense, circular artifice that defines the type of life it’s meant to fit into.

Women are genuinely trapped at the intersection of capitalism and patriarchy – two systems that, at their extremes, ensure that individual success comes at the expense of collective morality.

2. Why don’t creative women have the luxury of stretched time like men?

Unlike the male artists, who moved through life as if unfettered time to themselves were a birthright, the days and life trajectories of the handful of female artists featured in the book were often limited by the expectations and duties of home and care.

And it strikes me: it’s not that women haven’t had the talent to make their mark in the world of ideas and art. They’ve never had the time.

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sharing is caring: #64

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1. Hollywood is starting to re-examine the stereotypical bad feminist boss — but jury’s still.

Often they are conceived of as good at their jobs but bad at being human, like Miranda Priestly of “The Devil Wears Prada.” Though they are pitched as evidence of feminist progress, they don’t act like feminists. And their preferred targets are young women who hope, some day, to claim power, too.

The ruthlessly competent ladyboss gets a bad rap. But perhaps the more troublesome archetype is that of the bright young woman who rises to power without compromising her values at all. She makes it seem as if all of the problems of power can be neatly resolved by one plucky individual.

2. Airdrop is the new location based social networking app for teenagers.Read More »